English 3: Computer-Mediated Preparing for College Writing II, Summer 2010
Rick Dollieslager, Thomas Nelson Community College

parts of speech chart

Building blocks of the sentences, we need to know the parts of speech to know if we have written sentences.

Last Updated, 29 June, 11:45 a.m.

Over-arching goals of English 3

Assignments
Class Resources
Summer Class Schedule

Week 1
May 18-May 20

Week 2
May 25-May 27
Week 3
June 1-June 3
Week 4
June 8-June 10
Week 5
June 15-June17
Week 6
June 22-June 24
Week 7
June 29-July 1
Week 8
July 6-July 8
Finals
July 13 or 15

Important Notice!!

At the start each class, open this web page to look at the agenda for the day. At the end of each class, return to this web page to get your homework assignment and view the agenda for the next class. You'll never miss an assignment, a due date, or an important announcement if you come to this page every day.

--Week One--

Tuesday, 5/18/10

Essay Development Skills

Popcorn reading and discussion of "Succeeding Against the Odds"

Draft a paragraph of appproximately 150 words about a person you know who has become successful despite difficult circumstances.

 

Editing Skills

Reviewing Parts of speech:

Learning and Study Skills

In-class activity: On note cards, 1) define each grammar term (the parts of speech), in your own words, and 2) write at least three examples of each of the parts of speech on the card.

Homework assignment for Thursday 5/20:

  1. Finish drafting your "summary" paragraph that you started in class about someone who has succeeded against difficulties, approximately 150 words in length.
  2. Make note cards on the parts of speech listed above, the definition and recognition activity which we started in class today.
  3. Read some Eng. 3 students' essays on this topic if you are stuck on whom to write about. You may get some ideas from their papers that will help you think about someone you want to write about.

Thursday, 5/20/10

Cooperative Learning

In-class activity: Reader/Writer pair-share. You will pair up with one other person, and you will read each other's paragraph. You will underline the three things that you want to know more about regarding the person who is the subject of your partner's paragraph.

Essay Development Skills

Draft a 2nd paragraph of appproximately 100-150 words about a person you know who has become successful despite difficult circumstances, focusing on one of the three things your pair-share reader wanted to know more about. Your first paragraph, what I am calling the "summary" paragraph, will probably be revised into the introductory paragraph of your essay, so paragraph 2 will be one of your supporting paragraphs, in the body of the essay.

Editing Skills

Review your note cards on the parts of speech outlined in the assignment for today (posted above on 5/18) and revise them per our class discussion.

Cooperative Learning

In-class activity: In groups of three, we will review thesis statements and essay organization by reconstructing Bertrand Russell's essay "What I Have Lived For."

Homework assignments for Tuesday 5/25:

  1. Write three more separate supporting paragraphs about your successful person
  2. Read about 1] why it is important to understand and use conventional academic and professional prose and 2] how to speak in more professional ways.
  3. Make note cards on verbs, sentence subjects, clauses, independent clauses, and dependent clauses (also called subordinate clauses). Use the index of the on-line Guide to Grammar and Writing as your resource site for that information.

--Week Two--

Tuesday, 5/25/10

Cooperative Learning

In-class: Lecture on Cooperative Learning

 

Essay Development Skills

In-class activity: Reader/Writer pair-share. Give each other feedback on essay content and essay structure using the Revision and editing checklist.

Editing Skills

Review from note cards on clauses, independent clauses and dependent clauses.

Homework assignment for Thursday 5/27:

  1. Write an introductory and concluding paragraph including a good, unifying thesis statement in the introduction, in order to finish the first draft of your essay about a person who has succeeded against difficulties.
  2. Revise your body paragraphs per suggestions from your Reader/Writer pair-share. Focus of revision: a good thesis statement, topic sentences for each paragraph, concrete details that "show" your subject facing adversity, overcoming it, and becoming successful.
  3. Make two copies of your essay. Mark one copy as follows:
    1. Put all prepositional phrases inside parentheses and write "prep" above the preposition and "obj," above the object. Example: (on the floor)
    2. Underline the subject of each clause in your sentence with one line.
    3. Underline the verb of each clause with two lines.
    4. NOTE: Your paper is going to be too messy to read legibly after this marking, so that is why you need to print out two copies or make a photo copy if you have written it by hand.
  4. Make note cards on fragments, run-on sentences, and comma spliced sentences using the Guide to Grammar and Writing.

Thursday, 5/27/10

Editing Skills

Discuss handout: "The Least You Need to Know About Editing" in order to pass Eng. 3

Introduction to Perfect Copy to edit for sentence boundaries. Take notes about how PC works because you will be writing a comparative analysis of this program vs. W.W. Norton's Lesson Center program in a couple weeks.

 

Essay Development Skills

Read aloud. I'll read the best two essays to the whole class for discussion and feedback.

Cooperative Learning

Establishing base groups and doing a base-group activity: Punctuating "Landscape With the Fall of Icarus"

Homework assignment for Tuesday 6/1:

  1. Edit your essay to correct sentence boundary errors (fragments, run-ons and comma splices) after you have worked the editing lessons below.
  2. Work the following editing exercises from W.W. Norton's Lesson Center and email me the results at dollier@tncc.edu:
    1. Multiple choice lessons: a) Sentence elements, b) clauses, c) phrases, d) verb tenses e) verb forms NOTE Select the ten-question multiple choice quizzes rather than the five-question quizzes.
    2. Paragraph-style lessons: a) sentence fragments, b) comma splices and run-on sentences, c) subject-verb agreement
    3. Punctuate the following passage by making it into complete, grammatically correct sentences:
      1. that that is is that that is not is not that that is not that that is is that that is not is that not it it is

--Week Three--

Tuesday, 6/1/10

Learning and Study Skills

In-class activity: Taking lecture notes on the NHLP and brain development during learning

Learning and Study Skills

In-class activity: Taking lecture notes using the Cornell format note-taking methods

Homework assignment for Thursday 6/3:

Mark prepositional phrases and subjects and verbs on your successful person essay as follows:

  1. Put all prepositional phrases inside parentheses and write "prep" above the preposition and "obj," above the object. Example: (on the floor)
  2. Underline the subject of each clause in your sentence with one line.
  3. Underline the verb of each clause with two lines.
  4. NOTE: Your paper is going to be too messy to read legibly after this marking, so that is why you need to print out two copies or make a photo copy if you have written it by hand

Thursday, 6/3/10

Essay Development Skills

Read aloud. Guest lecture, Prof. Sulzberger: Power Writing!

 

Essay Development Skills

Drafting the first paragraph about how the brain works during learning using the Power Writing methods

Homework assignment for Tuesday 6/8:

Compose a Power Write paragraph on the Natural Human Learning Process (NHLP) following this pattern: 1 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3

--Week Four--

Tuesday, 6/8/10
Due: Write two more body paragraphs about how the brain functions during learning. Our three body paragraphs will have the following topics:

  1. The Natural Human Learning Process (NHLP)
  2. How the brain is changing physiologically and growing dendrites during the learning process
  3. How emotions affect the learning process and how we control that

Homework assignment for Thursday 6/10:

Finish drafting the body paragraphs (following the instructions above) about how the brain functions during learning. You will have three body paragraphs on this topic completely drafted before class on Thursday. On Thursday, we will compose introductory and concluding paragraphs to unify your body paragraphs into the essay.

Thursday, 6/10/10

Essay Development Skills

Compose introductory paragraphs and concluding paragraphs to unify your body paragraphs into an essay.

 

Learning and Study Skills

In-class activity: Demonstrating knowledge of how the brain functions during learning by writing about it.

Homework assignment for Tuesday 6/15:

  1. Finish the brain development essay by including an introductory and a concluding paragraph and revise the essay so that it all holds together well.
  2. Edit and revise the Successful Person essay

Due at the start of class on Tuesday, two rewritten essays: 1) A successful Person, 2) Brain Functioning During Learning. These will be revised and edited. Do not show me a sloppy draft of either of these essays on Tuesday. Make them as good as you can make them, ready to be evaluated for both content and editing skills.

--Week Five--

Tuesday, 6/15/10

Thursday, 6/17/10
Creating sentences by combining: Let's
try these.

Due at the start of class on Tuesday: 1) Copy and paste these 30 sentences into a Microsoft Word document and combine them following the three sets of instructions. 2) Use these sentence stems to construct two sentences for each sentence pattern, 1-8, from your sentence patterns handout. This will be a total of 16 sentences, two representing each construction pattern. Don't repeat the content of any sentences; instead, use different sets of sentence stems.

Note: These 46 sentences are due at the start of class on Tuesday, 6/22.

--Week Six--

Tuesday, 6/22/10
In class: 1] Discuss the
V.A.R.K
2] Writing workshop/mini-conferences on brain development paper and successful person paper

Draft a "one pager" Write a well developed paragraph of appx. 200-250 words that describes the VARK and demonstrates how you have learned specific things through your VARK learning preferences. The paragraph will need to tell your readers what the VARK is, who created it, and what it is used for (including the web site that accompanies it).

Use the journalist's heuristic for writing news stories, the "5 W's": Who, What, Why, Where, When and How (yes, "how" is an "H," not a "W," but it is always tossed in with the "5 W's.")

Homework assignment for Thursday 6/24:

Compose a "one-pager," a paragraph of 200-250 words which SHOWS that you learn in the ways that your VARK profile indicates you prefer to learn.

Thursday, 6/24/10
In class: 1] Compose a paragraph showing how you can use the V.A.R.K website to improve your ability to learn in the areas that are not your strongest according to your VARK profile. 2] Write an introduction and conclusion for the VARK essay. 3] Writing workshop/mini-conferences on brain development paper and successful person paper.

--Week Seven--


Tuesday, 6/29/10
In class: Portfolio Preparation workshop. First, write a sentence outline of each of your first three essays. The sentence outline will accompany the drafts of your essays and will include the following for each paper:

Second, edit, revise, improve your papers and conference with Mr. D. during class. Be ready to show your sentence outlines during paper conferences with Mr. D.

Thursday, 7/1/10
In class: Portfolio Preparation workshop

--Week Eight--

Tuesday, 7/6/10
In class: Portfolio Preparation workshop; partner up for aural editing

Thursday, 7/8/10
In class: Write the In-Class Final Essay; turn in portfolios

--Final Class--

Tuesday, 7/13/10
Portfolios conferences: We will 1] Write course evaluations, and 2] have our portfolio conferences.

 

 


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